Anti-Drone Gun Modeling #1

Wow, how time flies. Last time I posted on this blog it was all the way back in December, I think. That doesn’t mean I haven’t been busy on projects though! A few months ago I created a weapon concept called the FZS-712 Anti Drone Gun, part of my cyberpunk gun series. According to its lore, the gun uses an electromagnetic charge to disable, or destroy drones, depending on the setting the user chooses.

cyberpunkAntiDroneGun_USCF_small

Out of my cyberpunk weapons, it has the strongest design in regards to functionality and (in my opinion) aesthetics, so I decided it’d be a good item to build a 3D model of. I’ll eventually be using this gun as part of a reload and fire animation intended for a first person shooter game.

antidronegun1

The first few days I was able to get the general shape blocked out. The next week I started working on the details for the body of the gun. The body’s mesh still needs some cleaning, as there are some tris and n-gons present. I also need to drastically reduce the poly count at some point.

antidronegun2

The other parts of the gun don’t need as much mesh work. The stock is done in terms of modeling, and now I’m working its diffuse texture. Grunge will be added at a later stage, but for now I want to get the basic shapes and colors blocked in, so I can establish definitive masks for the self illumination maps.

antidronegun3

And that’s my progress thus far. I’ll continue to post updates on the model throughout the month, though I probably won’t conform to a particular schedule. I’m really doing this for my benefit- to see how quickly I can turn out a quality model. But for those who are reading, thank you! And please let me know if you have any tips or tricks in the comments.

Post commandeered by the US Claire Force

Brutalism & Branching Out

Hello all! It’s been awhile. I’ve been neck-deep in projects, cranking out art and assets left and right. Here’s some of my latest works.

Japanese Miko copy

This miko, or Japanese shrine maiden, is the first in a series that I am making for a card game named Feast! It’s a fantasy card game that centers around food, family, and frenzy. The goal of the game is to get all seven of your family members back at your table, by winning them over with gourmet food dishes from around the world. Other players will try to keep you from reuniting your family for a feast by playing cards such as rotten food, barbarians, thieving cats, and other shenanigans.

monkBarbarian

This is the second character I illustrated for Feast! He originally started off as a monk-gone-barbarian, but he looked too peaceful to belong to a roving horde, so I’m going to make him one of the clan’s family characters instead.

spicyRamenUSCF

Also for Feast!, this spicy ramen is based off of a dish of the same name from the eponymous Ramen Hakata in Addison, Texas. It’s also the first food illustration I’ve made for the card game.

Fortress from a Violent Planet WIP

Fortress From A Violent Planet, is a test of my skills in science fiction concept art and a work in progress. I noticed I had primarily fantasy concepts in my portfolio, so this is an attempt to improve my skills outside my normal range. In this concept, I drew references from various examples of brutalist architecture. Brutalist architecture, which came to existence around the latter half of the 20th century, employs large slabs of minimally adorned concrete in its design. The movement started with the French architect and artist Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, known better as Le Corbusier .Le Corbusier used the term béton brut, the French word meaning “raw concrete” to describe the style of his architecture.¹ However, it was the critic Reynar Banham² who coined the term “brutalism”, as he found the style atrocious and unfriendly.

Well, that’s all folks. Look forward to my next post coming out Jan. 30th. Until next time…

Post commandeered by the US Claire Force

¹”The Rise and Fall of Brutalist Architecture – Voices of East Anglia.” Voices of East Anglia. 3 Aug. 2011. Web. 16 Jan. 2016.

²Brutalism. (n.d.). Retrieved January 16, 2016, from http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/heritage/brutalism